Mt Furo (839m), Mt Takasasu (911m) & Mt Sebuchi (554m), Uenohara City, Yamanashi Prefecture, Thursday, December 30, 2021

I found these three peaks north of the Chuo line and east of Otsuki station by simply examining my hiking map. They don’t belong to any famous lists, but together they form a short, easy hike with views of Mt Fuji, making it suitable for the last outing of the year. I could get to the start of the trail by riding the local Chuo line to Uenohara station, followed by a short bus ride, although I would have to leave before 7am to catch the only bus running in the morning. The weather was supposed to be sunny, with some wind, but since all tree peaks were below one thousand meters, the temperatures wouldn’t go below freezing. I was looking forward to wrapping up the year with a quiet hike and getting some new views.

Mt Fuji before its disappearance in the clouds

The Doshi mountains and the Tanzawa mountains (behind)

I arrived at Uenohara station under blue skies and quickly transferred to the Fujikyu bus. I was the sole passenger and got off at the end of the line just after 9am. I followed a paved road for a short while before reaching the start of the trail, next to a small graveyard. The path went up the mountain side in a series of switchbacks and soon reached a small shrine with a view of Mt Fuji, framed by two pine trees. After some more climbing, I reached the top of Mt Furo (不老山 ふろうさん furou-san, meaning “enduring youth”).

An easy hike up the first summit of the day

View of Mt Fuji framed by two pine trees

I had a view of the all the mountains south of the Chuo line. To the west, I could see Mt Fuji, the top now in the clouds; opposite were the Doshi mountains, with the Tanzawa mountains rising behind; eastwards, I could make out Sagami lake and Mt Tsukui-Shiro. It was nearly 11am, so I sat down on the sole bench, fortunately in the sun, for a late breakfast. Below, the Chuo expressway seemed busy with people driving to their hometowns for the new year. I set off again, and after a short, steep climb, arrived at the summit of Mt Takasasu (高指山 たかさすやま takasasu-yama).

View of the mountains south of the Chuo line

Looking through the trees towards Mt Sebuchi

The summit was entirely in the trees, and although it was also in the sun, I moved on immediately, as I had just stopped for a break. The path went downhill and became harder to follow. After some switchbacks, I reached a forest road, and soon after, an intersection. The hiking path continued behind a huge boulder, and due to some fallen trees, was a bit difficult to follow. Eventually, I arrived back on a forest road, which then turned in a steep paved road leading to a grassy summit. I found the summit marker for Mt Sebuchi (瀬淵山 せぶちやま sebuchi-yama), on a tree next to a shrine.

Looking back towards Mt Takasasu

View from the paragliding jump-off spot

The mountain is also used as a jump-off spot for paragliders; I had seen some when hiking Mt Yogai nearly a year ago. The view was similar to the one from the first summit of the day, except that I couldn’t see Mt Fuji at all; I could see the long ridgeline of Mt Nodake eastwards. It was one o’clock so I found a bench in the sun and sat down for lunch. At 1h30, I made my way back to the intersection, and from there headed down the mountain. I arrived at a bus stop on the same line I had used in the morning just before 2pm. After a short bus ride, I was back at Uenohara station, where I boarded a local train for Shinjuku station.

See the views on this three-peak hike

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