Mt Nango (610m), Mt Maku (626m) and Mt Shiro (563m), Yugawara Town, Kanagawa Prefecture

I felt like it was time to try something different, something special to Japan; I wanted to do a hike next to the ocean. I found one such hike in my hiking book, but it seemed a bit short, so I combined it with a couple of nearby peaks. Although the elevation of these three mountains was relatively low, they seemed quite impressive when seen from the sea-side town of Yugawara, famous for its plum blossoms and hot springs. The area is also known for rock climbing, although today’s purpose was purely hiking.

HOW TO GET THERE: From Tokyo or Shinagawa station, catch the Tokaido line to Atami;  Yugawara is the stop before. Depending on the type of train you catch, it takes between 60 and 90 minutes, direct or with changes. This is not a line I take often so it was a pleasant change with lots of views of the sea (sit on the left when heading out). From the station there are frequent buses to “Kaiya” which is the last stop. I was the sole person on the bus for the last portion of the trip, and on the first part of the hike.

Ask for a hiking plan for Mt Nango, Mt Maku, Mt Shiro

THE ROUTE: The bus stops in front of a temple, but the hiking trail doesn’t go through it. There wasn’t anybody around to ask, but I found a sign for the hiking trail along the road that continues up the mountain to the left of the temple. The signposting was particularly poor on this hike, and some route-finding was needed (this was nearly ten years ago so things may have changed). I followed the road as it curved to the right and then back to the left again, with many minor roads branching off it. I eventually reached a sign pointing straight up a very steep slope; it must of had an inclination of 45 degrees; I cannot imagine driving up here with ice or snow, although I guess that it rarely happens in this area (it felt pretty balmy for December).

Mountain Mikans

Japanese citrus fruit or mikan

A cape jutting into Sagami bay

Manazuru peninsula jutting into Sagami bay

Soon I was walking among the mikan trees with their bright orange fruit. I was getting pretty views of Yugawara town, Sagami bay and the surrounding mountains. I couldn’t see any more signs, but I decided to stick to the main road, a tough proposition since the other roads that branched off seemed to be the same width (wide enough for a small car). Instinct served me well, for shortly after entering a forest section, I found another wooden signpost for the summit. Unfortunately this sign was placed a few meters before another junction. I hesitated for a couple of minutes, and then continued in the most plausible direction which was straight ahead.

Towards Izu

Looking South to Izu

Mt Maku, I think

Near the top of Mt Nango

Since I was going up the side of a steep mountain, taking the wrong way could have big consequences. Fortunately, as I reached the top of the ridge, I came upon a third and better sign marking the start of a proper hiking trail. The surrounding landscape had become quite fascinating, not because of its beauty, but because of the sense of abandonment. This area had enjoyed a boom a few decades ago, but was now in decline, and there were a lot of ruined buildings making it a little spooky.

Now I was following a proper hiking path along the ridge. The views were hidden by the surrounding vegetation, lucky in a way, since it had become considerably windy. I was skirting a golf course, surrounded by an electric fence to keep trespassers (or hikers) out. I then reached a road, and after following it for a few minutes, I came to a hiking path on the left heading to the top of Mt Nango (南郷山 nangosan)about ten minutes away. There were some nice views of the coastline a few meters below the summit, better than from the summit itself. Here I met some other hikers, as it usually happens at the tops of mountains, and was easily able to get someone to take my photo.

Mountain scape near the coast

Mountain scenery near the coast

A great forest path

Easy walking through the forest

After a short rest, I set out again for summit number two and the highest point of the hike. Here the signposting let me down again. At the first intersection, there were no signs for my mountain, only a sign going straight to a temple, and a one pointing for the road that running between the two mountains. I had to cross the road at one point, but according to my map, not before passing by a small lake. So I decided to continue straight ahead. This turned out to be wrong, and I was soon forced to retrace my steps. Back at the junction, I took the second path towards the road (now going right). This was a pretty trail, zigzagging down through a pine wood before reaching a flat wooded area, where I crossed what must have been the other path leading down from Mt Nango.

The path to Mt Maku

The path to Mt Maku

Nearing the top

Getting close to the top of Mt Maku

Here I turned right and continued walking through some more delightful forest. I finally spotted the lake that I had been aiming for. It was a small and lonely lake hidden in the middle of the forest. Just beyond it was the road which I crossed in order to re-enter the woods on the other side. This part was really pleasant and made me want to bring other people here.

After a few minutes I reached the path heading for the summit. It took me another fifteen minutes of gentle climbing to reach Mt Maku (幕山 makuyama). From there I could see the ocean and the surrounding mountains. There weren’t any benches so I sat on the ground to have lunch. Since my view while sitting was obscured by bamboo grass, and the wind was terribly strong, probably due to the proximity of the sea, I decided not to linger.

Nice ocean views

Nice ocean views

Enjoying the soft autumn sunshine

Enjoying the soft autumn sunshine

Heading down, I mistakenly turned onto a path circling the summit. Once I realized this, I cut back through the woods and got back on the correct path. I was soon facing south and had some nice views of Sagami bay. I passed a group who had taken my photo on the summit, and left them behind me scratching their heads, since I had left ahead of them.

Eventually I got to the base of the mountain and got to see its famous rock climbing cliffs. There were a few people practising their skill in the good weather. It was interesting to note that they place mattresses underneath in case they fall. That’s Japanese safety for you. This is where the famous Yugawara plum trees are located (just bare branches at this time of the year).

The rocky base of Mt Maku

The rocky base of Mt Maku

Rock Climbing part I

The rock climbing area

I was now following a paved road along the bottom of a valley. It was only 3pm, but the winter sun was already starting to dip below the surrounding ridges. I stopped to take photos of the beautiful colours of a maple tree and the shadows nearly overtook me. A little later I crossed a bridge, went straight another hundred meters,  turned left up another smaller road, and ten minutes later reached a small hiking trail. The paved road continues around Mt Maku, and joins up with the path I went up on the other side.

Orange Maple tree

Orange Maple tree

Short but nice river walk

Short but nice river walk

Here darkness overtook me as the path twisted and turned through thick forest. There were a few ropes and chains, but nothing challenging. It was tough to climb up a mountain again, but it was too soon to head back. After about 30 minutes I reached a small shrine under a small waterfall. Above it, there was a paved path lined with stone lanterns switching back and forth; it felt rather sacred. At this time, there was nobody else around.

Turn left here

Walking along the valley before climbing again

The holy path

The path to the shrine

I reached another road which I followed through a windy tunnel under the highest section of the ridge. On the other side, I emerged back into the sun. I followed the road one hundred meters to a lookout point and a bus stop. Behind the observation platform, I found the hiking trail again. It double backed towards the ridge and passed above the tunnel. This was an enjoyable section despite the strong wind, heading slightly downhill with occasional views of the adjacent ridges and the ocean.

Windy but nice view

In the sun again…

The Izu peninsula

The Izu peninsula

A short while later I reached the final summit of the day, Mt Shiro (城山 shiroyama). It was the lowest of the three peaks, but it had by far the best view, with places to sit down and no vegetation in the way (and toilets as well!). At this late hour, I had the summit to myself. To the South was the Izu peninsula, to the North was the Shonan coastline, and beyond, the Landmark Tower in Yokohama, to the west was Oshima Island. The most amazing thing about this summit was that it was right at the edge of the sea. I think it’s the first time I have stood about 500 meters directly above the coastline.

Ocean view

The coveted ocean view

Mt Maku ridge

Looking back at Mt Maku

I had to pull myself away from this great view only fifteen minutes after arriving, since I really needed to get down before dark. I headed down at a fast pace, the path being relatively easy to walk. There another good view of Oshima island on the way. Very soon I reached a paved road. My map showed that there were a couple of shortcuts so that you didn’t to walk so much on the road. However I got tricked on the second one, it led basically nowhere, and I had to climb five minutes back to the road.

When I got to the real short cut, I didn’t dare to take it so I jogged the wide bend of the road. Soon I started seeing signs of civilisation again: telephone wires, houses and cars. There were again no signs and more roads than were indicated on the map, but following my instinct I ended back at the station by dusk. I celebrated by taking a hot bath at an onsen with outdoor bath just five minutes down the road, on the top floor of the hotel.

Ask for a hiking plan for Mt Nango, Mt Maku, Mt Shiro

Final view of Ooshima

Final view of Ooshima

4 thoughts on “Mt Nango (610m), Mt Maku (626m) and Mt Shiro (563m), Yugawara Town, Kanagawa Prefecture”

  1. Hi,
    I will be in Japan in early December, and would like to try some hikes wtih my family, The one described here sounds very interesting. How long did this hike take you? We will be coming from Minami Gyotoku and I’m trying to find a hike nearer to where I would be staying.
    Would it be difficult to find the start point and to follow the hike if I don’t read much Japanese?
    Thank you; your advice would be much appreciated.

    Regards,
    Lyn

    1. Hi Lyn, sorry for never replying to you. I stopped blogging for a while so I didn’t see your question. If I had seen it I would have recommended heading the other direction to Chiba. Chiba has some great family-oriented hikes and the autumn leaves usually peak early December. The place to go is Yoro Keikyoku 要路渓谷 (Yoro Valley). As usual most hikes there have little information in English but it’s quite popular and you would simply have to follow the other people. Another option is Nokogiri yama 鋸山.

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