Nama Soba Gezan, Numata City, Gunma Prefecture

On my way to the Tanbara Highland hike, I stopped for an early lunch at the popular Nama Soba Gezan 生そば下山. The name combines “freshly made soba” with a word that means “descending from the mountain”. I chose it since it had a high rating on Tabelog, and was conveniently situated on the road leading to my hiking destination. I was able to time my arrival to a few minutes before the 11h30 opening time, and was surprised to get the last free parking spot; in reality there were only 3 other cars, but I didn’t expect to be last in line way out in the countryside.

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The restaurant is prepared for long lines

Fortunately I was seated almost immediately. I loved the traditional setting of the restaurant, especially the sunken fireplaces. Although it was possible to sit on a tatami floor, I prefered a table for the sake of my long legs. The menu was all in Japanese, with vertical writing and prices in the Japanese system. I chose Zaru Soba (“seiro” on the menu), Since the buckwheat noodles are made from scratch, I thought this would be the best way to enjoy their flavour. I ordered “maitake tempura moriawase” as a side dish.

On the left “fresh soba” and on the right “mushroom tempura assortment” 

The food was served quickly. I was reminded by the waiter to first dip the noodles into the “tsuyu” sauce before adding the spring onion and radish. Afterwards, I should add them gradually to enjoy the change in taste. Adding toppings little by little is also recommended by some ramen restaurants in Tokyo, so I was familiar with the process. The serving of tempura was huge and delicious. There was even corn on the cob tempura, so unexpected that I bit the cob itself by mistake. The soba itself was a class above anything I had before.

Japanese sunken hearths or “irori” inside the restaurant

There was a “jizake“, or local sake, on the menu, but I had to skip it since I was driving. It was the Tanigawadake brand by the Nagai Brewery which I was familiar with. The total cost was 1600 yen, quite reasonable for a filling soba and tempura lunch. Whether descending or ascending a mountain, it’s a great place to stop for lunch!

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