Mt Mine (548m), Mt Nobotto (436m) & Mt Shusuke (383m), Hanno City, Saitama Prefecture

After unexpectedly walking a part of the “Okumusashi Long Trail” on my previous hike, I decided to explore another section of this new long distance trail. I would access it the same way, by riding a bus from Hanno station and climbing to Takedera Temple; this time however, I would follow the ridgeline south, instead of north; at the end, I would catch the same bus back, but closer to the station. My hiking map didn’t show any good trails along this route, so I was putting my trust in the “Okumusashi Long Trail”. Thanks to the many buses running from and to Hanno station, I could leave later in the day and finish anytime before nightfall. The weather forecast announced low clouds but no rain; I didn’t think there would be any viewpoints anyway, so I left for my hike in high spirits.

Hiking the Okumusashi Long Trail 奥武蔵ロングトレイル

Misty view from the Yahatazaka Pass

From Ikebukuro station, it took just ninety minutes to reach the bus stop near the start of the trail. It was already past noon and the weather was gloomier than I had expected; the surrounding mountains were cloaked in mist. I nearly walked into a spider web while visiting the restroom at the bus stop, it was already spider season again, and I still had vivid memories of my spider-infested hike up Mt Kinjo last year. I grabbed a walking stick near the start of the trail so that I could wave back and forth to clear any webs in my way.

Temple bell of Teradera

The bell made a long resonating noise when struck

I soon arrived at the first viewpoint at the base of an electric pylon; I saw many flowers with white, fluffy seed heads, a sign that summer was ending soon. It took 30 minutes to reach Yahatazaka (八幡坂) at the top of ridge. I decided to make a short detour above Taketera Temple. It was a good idea since I soon came upon another viewpoint, and the temple bell. The view was solid white, so I consoled myself by giving the bell a good gong (see video). After reaching the trail for Mt Atago, I headed back to Yahatazaka, passing Teradera on the way.

View from Yahatazaka Pass towards Yahatazaka

Following the pylons

I was finally walking south along the ridge. After some downhill, I reached Yahatazaka Pass (八幡坂峠 560m), another viewpoint at the base of a pylon, where I stopped for a quick lunch. The next part of the trail was perhaps the nicest part of the hike. It followed the pylons along a narrow clearing overgrown by ferns. I was all alone, except for a family of pheasants. It reminded me of walking the firebreaks in the Ardennes. Very soon, I reached a signpost for Mt Takinoiri (滝ノ入山 580m), the highest point of the hike, although it didn’t feel like a mountain summit.

Signs of the summer end: a seed head and a mushroom head

View south towards the hills of Okutama

After a quick descent and a flat bit through dark forest, I reached the final and best viewpoint of the day, Mt Mine (嶺 みね), at the base of another pylon. I could see the green rounded hills of Okutama stretching into the distance; I made a mental note to return on a day with better weather. The next part of the trail wasn’t marked on my map; I continued my hike feeling excited to be exploring a brand new path. I was soon walking through thick, beautiful forest; it almost felt like I was inside the nearby Chichibu-Tama-Kai national park.

Among the vegetation, there is a trail somewhere

Another obstacle to surmount

I arrived at a small road, but easily found the next part of the trail beyond. After hiking through some more lovely forest, I arrived at the summit of Mt Nobotto (登戸 のぼっと). There was no view, just some noisy crows, so I continued without a break. At 3h30, I reached the final summit of the day, Mt Shusuke (周助山 しゅすけやま shusuke-yama). No sooner had I set off again that I walked into a spider web; fortunately for me its owner was on the higher reaches. After dusting off the cobwebs, I headed down the mountain. Very soon I reached houses and a road, and at 4h15 I was sitting on the bus back to Hanno station where I caught the limited express back to Tokyo.

Listen to the sounds of the Okumusashi Long Trail

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